America's Most Wanted fugitive caught in Frankston

Monday, July 2, 2012 - 1:48pm

Brian Maurice Fuller was one of those guys who could seemingly do it all. He was an accomplished piano player, he had a flair for home decorating and extensive knowledge of antiques and collectibles. In his mind though, it was his tennis playing that was going to be his ticket out of Wichita Falls, Texas.

He got a job at the local country club, teaching the city's upper crust how to serve and volley. He figured he'd parlay those relationships into people who would finance his career on the pro tennis circuit. But that plan went awry when he learned the people he taught saw him as nothing more than another country club worker. With that failed venture, Maurice's hatred for the wealthy, especially women, grew.

With his dreams of playing tennis vanishing, Fuller found another use for the country club dwellers: they'd become his victims. Fuller turned to using these relationships as entres into rich houses where he'd use his knowledge of antiques and expensive pieces of art to rip them off. The plan worked swimmingly until he made the critical mistake of fencing the goods across state lines. When cops finally caught up with him, he went down Federally. You'd think serving significant time would scare someone straight. For Maurice, cops say it just forced him to re-think how he committed his crimes.

Upon his release from Federal prison, it appears that Fuller had made amends. He dabbled in real estate, even opening interior decorating and roofing businesses. He became a well-known fixture in the Wichita Falls business world. He made a habit of hiring down-on-their luck convicts and drug addicts to do his labor. It could be said he did it to give these poor souls a second chance.

But that wouldn't be correct. Just ask Timothy Walters.

Walters was a heroin addict, desperate for any dollar he could shoot into his veins. Maurice knew that so when he scanned his employee list for a specific job, Walters fit the bill. According to Walters, the agreement was $1000 and heroin. But what he had to do was pretty vague. On January 25, 2010, cops say Maurice pulled into the parking lot of a Whole Foods in an upscale neighborhood in Dallas. A drugged-up Walters rode shotgun. Surveillance cameras show Fuller's gleaming-white Jaguar prowl the parking lot for the right parking space.

The videotape continues to roll to show what appears to be Fuller walking into the store, wearing his trademark pajama pants and flip flops. The final piece of videotape is the most insidious: minutes later, store customer Jil Katz leaves the store and rounds the corner. It is at her car where it all goes down: the videotape shows Walters get out of Fuller's car and attack Katz. Walters admits to beating her and taking a necklace and a beautiful diamond ring. He claims it was all Fuller's doing. He says Fuller cased the store, looking for the right target. Apparently, Katz was that target.

Cops arrested both Fuller and Walters, but a judge allowed Fuller out on bail, awaiting trial.

Authorities arrested Brian Fuller in Frankston, TX., as the result of tips received by the AMW hotline.

Anderson County officials tell KETK they captured Fuller on Sunday with the help of a Dallas fugitive task force, DPS, and U.S. Marshals at a house located on the 1500 block of CR 319.

Fuller is currently in the Anderson County Jail and will be turned over to Dallas County in the next 10 days.

News

Comments News Comments

Post new Comment