AEG Live to get its last chance to argue in Michael Jackson wrongful death trial

CNN
Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - 9:38am

Michael Jackson's last concert promoter has four hours Wednesday to convince a jury that it is not responsible for the pop icon's death.

AEG Live attorney Marvin Putnam warned in his opening statements in the Jackson wrongful death trial five months ago that he would show "ugly stuff" and reveal Jackson's "deepest, darkest secret."

The revelations that jurors heard from 58 witnesses over 83 days of testimony over 21 weeks included details of Jackson's drug use and his shopping for a doctor to give him the surgical anesthetic propofol that he thought would give him sleep.

Brian Panish, the lead lawyer for Jackson's mother and three children, conceded in his closing Tuesday that the singer may have some fault for his own death, but "it's about shared responsibility."

Jackson did use prescription painkillers and was warned that using propofol at home to sleep was risky, "but he never had a problem until Dr. Conrad Murray was working and until Conrad Murray negotiated with AEG Live," Panish argued.

He urged jurors to award the family between $1 billion and $2 billion in damages for its share of liability in Jackson's death -- to replace what he would have earned touring, had he lived, and for the personal suffering from the loss of a son and father.

Katherine Jackson testified that she filed the wrongful death lawsuit three years ago against AEG Live "because I want to know what really happened to my son."

Her lawyers argue that the company is liable in the death because it negligently hired, retained or supervised Murray, who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in Jackson's propofol overdose death.

After AEG Live's Putnam delivers his closing arguments Wednesday, Jackson's lawyer will have another two hours Thursday morning to sum up his arguments in rebuttal.

Twelve jurors, who have sat and listened in a Los Angeles courtroom for 21 weeks, will then begin deliberations.

The judge is allowing a television camera in court for the closing arguments and verdict.

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